About Bob Murray

My name is Bob Murray and I live well with dementia. I want to share my experiences so I can help and meet others on the same voyage.

From these experiences I have learned three very important lessons:

  1. Always expect the unexpectedYes. I live with dementia
  2. Keep on living as well as you can
  3. The most important person in my life is my caregiver, Leah, my wife.

Thank you for reading my blog. Please leave a comment and let me know what you think.

My blog: This voyage tells the story of my life with dementia – Why am I telling you this? Because Dementia is nothing to be ashamed of.  As part of my life, it is ever present and I intend to continue successfully to wherever the voyage takes me. The subtitle is “living well with dementia”.

COMMENT

I’ve been Lucky. My dementia is progressing slowly. My ‘senior moments’ are increasing in frequency but, with the help of my caregiver, my wife, I am still living well with dementia.

GUIDELINES

My ‘mild cognitive impairment’ (MIC) was uncovered in 2013 through a SPECT brain scan in 2013. Since then I have read everything that I can find on MIC and Dementia. They, the experts, say that I have a terminal disease and that there is no known cure. The worst of all the dementias is Alzheimer’s Disease (AD).

I feel that I can slow the progression to Alzheimer’s Disease through good health choices, exercising and nutrition and everything in moderation. AD often means full-time care (24/7) in a nursing home. I don’t want to go there.

There are 2 Doctor’s work that I follow closely – Dr. Dale E. Bredeson and Dr. Norman Doidge. If you were to google these names you will discover a great deal of information re the reversal of cognitive decline and the brain’s way of healing. These are my guidelines for my life in my future. My genetics tell me that I could have another 20 years.

LIVING WELL WITH DEMENTIA

I’m 79 years old and I’ve had a good life.

I have ‘lived well’ with arthritis, cancer, a lousy memory, a hearing impairment, depression and more and I still live with these health issues the least of which is ‘ageing’. Dementia came to my attention when I was 74 years old. Many called it just old age but I know better.

MY VOYAGE WITH DEMENTIA

When I was 78 years old my family doctor and the head of our memory clinic and my local Alzheimer’s Society told me that there was nothing they could do for me – I was doing well. From my time with depression (my early 40’s), I learned that writing about myself was very therapeutic. I met with our local Alzheimer’s Society and we developed a strategy that I would tell my story re dementia and they would publish it in their monthly Alzheimer’s e-newsletter. Thus was born “My Voyage with Dementia”. The September column will be my 11th column and there are now 909 people following my voyage. All the columns are on this blog – https://myvoyage553264702.wordpress.com/

BEING PUBLISHED

My column is now being published in a local weekly newspaper as well as in their weekly web site http://www.SouthWesternOntario.ca. Seeing my opinion column in print is very exciting. Coming up with monthly columns with my personal experiences on dementia has not been as tough a job as I had anticipated. Going weekly may be in my future – it excites me as a great challenge. I meet with the newspaper in 2 weeks to decide on a win-win course of action. Stay tuned and, in the meantime please read my past columns – I appreciate comments. This challenge seems to be slowing the progress of my dementia. Time will tell.

THIS IS MY STORY TO DATE

Please remember that my comments are my personal opinions and I seldom have any proof that what I say is absolutely true.

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